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Have your say on police funding in Gwent

Residents in Gwent are being asked how much they are willing to pay for local policing.

Gwent Police has seen a 40 per cent real term cut in government funding since 2010 and has made nearly £50 million in savings across the force since 2008.

An increase of £1 a month in council tax (per band D household) would allow Gwent Police to maintain the 1,290 police officers it currently has until at least 2020/21.

It would also allow the force to maintain investment in priority areas including serious organised crime, cybercrime, violent crime and supporting vulnerable people.

Without the increase Gwent Police will have to make further cuts of about £5.3 million across the force. 

The Police and Crime Commissioner (PCC) for Gwent, Jeff Cuthbert, is responsible for setting the annual precept, which is the amount residents pay towards policing through their council tax.

He said: “We have made nearly £50 million in savings across Gwent Police since 2008. At the same time we have seen an increase in demand in areas such as child sexual exploitation, modern day slavery and cybercrime which are stretching our officers and staff like never before.

“Nobody wants to pay more on their council tax but unfortunately with the government grant for policing at standstill levels at best, there are no easy savings left for us to make. If the precept is not increased then this will undoubtedly have a significant impact on policing in Gwent.

“I am confident that a rise in the council tax precept of £1 a month, which is about 25p per week for the average property, will allow us to continue to provide a high level of service.

“I want to hear what the people of Gwent have to say and I would urge as many people as possible to complete this survey.”

To have your say before Sunday 13 January 2019 visit bit.ly/GwentPrecept19-20

Alternatively, other formats of the survey are available on request from the Police and Crime Commissioner’s office by emailing commissioner@gwent.pnn.police.uk or calling 01633 642200